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On top of those issues, natural deposits of arsenic bleed into groundwater at times. Rain, sleet and snow are known to pull arsenic particles from the air and distribute them in drinking water as well.

Arsenic Exposure: Sources, Risks and Solutions

By definition, arsenic is a brittle, gray metalloid bearing the atomic number 33. In the more common sense, it's a toxic element used to make rat poison. As fate would have it, it's also found in certain fruit seeds and juices in trace amounts; of course, it'd take an inconsumable amount of juice to actually poison a human or animal. When it comes to this particular heavy metal, the most significant concern is contaminated drinking water. While products developed by Hepure can help mitigate such an issue, dangerous levels of arsenic leaching into ground water certainly isn't unheard of.

How Might Arsenic Make its Way into the Water Supply?

Numerous industries use arsenic in one form or another. In electronics manufacturing, it's used in semi-conductive components. Certain wood preservatives and glass-making processes also include compounds containing arsenic. It's also widely used in agricultural chemicals. All that being said, industrial spills, improper disposal of byproducts and agricultural runoff are all common culprits when it comes to contaminated drinking water.

On top of those issues, natural deposits of arsenic bleed into groundwater at times. Rain, sleet and snow are known to pull arsenic particles from the air and distribute them in drinking water as well. Regardless of which of these routes the metal takes to the water supply, it can be incredibly dangerous once it gets there if not mitigated by home filtration systems and on-site solutions like zero valent iron.

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Dangers of Arsenic in Drinking Water

By and large, the most critical impact of prolonged arsenic exposure is cancer. As a proven carcinogen, this metal can cause skin, lung, kidney and bladder cancer with others potentially entering the mix as well. Greatest risks typically result from high concentrations of the toxin combined with additional cancer-causing factors. Other hazards include:

Skin Changes: Besides skin cancer, arsenic exposure can lead to thickening of the skin and changes in pigmentation. Other skin issues have also been reported among those in areas with contaminated drinking water.

Blood and Circulation Issues: Studies have linked arsenic exposure to blood vessel constriction, reduced blood flow, lowered red blood cell production and even destruction of otherwise healthy blood cells.

Liver Problems: Since the liver is tasked with filtering toxins out of the bloodstream, it's one of the organs most vulnerable to arsenic. Exposure can lead to liver disease and enlargement as well as health issues stemming from a damaged liver.

At present, researchers are on an ongoing mission to find more information about other effects of arsenic toxicity. New potential connections between the metal and certain medical conditions are continually being unearthed. Feel free to visit our site to learn about ways of stopping arsenic exposure at its source.